Ronald E. Hampton

Washington, DC

Ronald Hampton retired from the D.C. Metropolitan Police Department after twenty-three years of service as Community Relations Officer. He is reputed for his outstanding work with the citizens of the Third District in Washington, D.C. in crime prevention and community participation and relations. His extensive experience and knowledge in community relations and policing has resulted in education and training opportunities for Mr. Hampton locally, nationally, and internationally.

Mr. Hampton is the immediate past Executive Director of the National Black Police Association, Inc. He was involved in designing and delivering community policing and problem solving training for residents in public housing as well as overseeing a project dealing with intervention and crime prevention through alternative community sentencing. Over the years, he has assisted the Department of Justice's Community Relations Service with community relations and crime prevention. He has also worked with the National Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty and has lectured at the American University's Washington Semester School Criminal Justice Program. In addition, along with other educators/trainers, he developed an anti-racism and organizational change program for Amnesty International USA.

With his reputation and expertise in community policing as well as human rights, Mr. Hampton serves as a consultant-educator to the Carter Center of Emory University, Human Rights Program. His work with the Carter Center has lead to working in countries like Ethiopia and Guyana. He has also provided consultation services for organizations in Britain, Canada and the Bahamas. In 1996, Mr. Hampton led a People to People, Citizens' Ambassador Program Law Enforcement Delegation of 23 to South Africa.

Mr. Hampton also volunteers for several organizations. He serves on the Federal Board of the Drug Policy Foundations' Law Enforcement Committee; he is a member of the Board of Directors of the American Civil Liberties Union in Washington, D.C., and serves on the Advisory Committee, Capital Punishment Project; and he is a former Board Member of Amnesty International, USA.