Civilian Review: News and Publications

Investigation of the Chicago Police Department

Author: 
United States Department of Justice Civil Rights Division
Publisher: 
United States Department of Justice Civil Rights Division

"The pattern of unlawful force we found resulted from a collection of poor police practices that our investigation indicated are used routinely within [the Chicago Police Department].  We found that officers engage in tactically unsound and unnecessary foot pursuits, and that these foot pursuits too often end with officers unreasonably shooting someone—including unarmed individuals.  We found that officers shoot at vehicles without justification and in contradiction to CPD policy.  We found further that officers exhibit poor discipline when discharging their weapons and engage in tactics that endanger themselves and public safety, including failing to await backup when they safely could and should; using unsound tactics in approaching vehicles; and using their own vehicles in a manner that is dangerous.  These are issues that can and must be better addressed through training, accountability and ultimately cultural change."

Also see: http://chicagoreporter.com/justice-department-report-on-chicago-police-a...

A Mutated Rule: Lack of Enforcement In the Face of Persistent Chokehold Complaints in New York City

Author: 
NYC Civilian Complaint Review Board
Publisher: 
NYC Civilian Complaint Review Board

"In July 2014, CCRB Board Chair Richard Emery, in the wake of the tragic death of Eric Garner and on behalf of his fellow Board members, asked the CCRB staff to undertake an objective, comprehensive assessment of chokehold complaints made to the CCRB. This study investigates chokehold complaints, primarily from January 2009 until June 2014, in order to report findings and make recommendations to the Police Commissioner and the public. After documenting and evaluating five and a half years of chokehold complaints, their patterns and the likely causes of their persistence, this report recommends ways in which the CCRB and the NYPD can collaborate to reduce chokehold incidents and eliminate future chokehold tragedies. This report is an agency report prepared by staff as directed by the Chair."

The State of Policing in the United States, Volume 1

Author: 
Community Oriented Policing Service
Publisher: 
Department of Justice

On December 5th, 2016, the U.S. Department of Justice's Community Oriented Policing Services published its report, The State of Policing in the United States, Volume 1, at a White House Office of Public Engagement and Intergovernmental Affairs briefing in Massachusetts.

"One of the recommendations of the Final Report of the President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing was the delivery of an annual report on the state of American policing, which would provide an updated overview of events and changes in policies and practices, as well as their impact on police officers and the public. This inaugural report reviews law enforcement activities and developments from January 2015 to March 2016 and offers research and other resources for more in-depth analysis.  Divided into three sections, the first part identifies the many ways in which the field was tested, including topics such as excessive use of force. The second section discusses community policing approaches and other strategies that police used to engage their communities and enhance public safety. The third section examines the impact of events and policies on law enforcement officers and their work."

Portland NLG & NPAP Members Secure a Place at the Bargaining Table

On February 19, 2013, U.S. District Court Judge Michael Simon ruled that the AMA Coalition for Justice and Police Reform can participate in mediation with the City of Portland, the Department of Justice and the Portland Police Union to address a settlement agreement on police reforms. The settlement agreement arises out of a suit by the U.S. Department of Justice, which alleges that Portland Police use excessive force in interactions with people who are mentally ill, or who are perceived to be mentally ill.

Enhancing Civilian Participation in the Review of Complaints and Use of Force in the Boston Police Department

Author: 
Jack McDevitt, Amy Farrell, W. Carsten Andresen
Publisher: 
Institute on Race and Justice Northeastern University, reprinted with permission.
This report was prepared in 2005 by Northeastern University’s Institute on Race and Justice in partnership with the Boston Police Department (BPD) to enhance integrity within the BPD. The researchers conducted a historical analysis of civilian review and identified best practices in civilian review across the country. In addition to reviewing best practices nationally, the researchers analyzed the complaint and use of force investigation and review processes that were in place at the time in Boston and made recommendations to improve these processes and introduce external civilian oversight. Unfortunately, the Community Ombudsman Oversight Panel (COOP) that was established in 2007 by executive order of Boston Mayor Thomas Menino falls short of the recommendations made by the report. A coalition of civil rights and community organizations, among them the NPAP, is currently working on improving civilian oversight in Boston. Community Ombudsman Oversight Panel (COOP) http://www.cityofboston.gov/police/co-op/

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